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May 6, 2015
Do the Work Up Front: A Case for Neuroscience in AdLand
 
As a young marketing professional with an interest in marketing strategy and research, we didn't find ourselves with the "in" crowd in the agency life. Though we were used often and called upon for very high-level stuff as an assistant manager, we weren't with the creative folks.

It was all made well when, during one of our first few company meetings, our chief said that he "would rather have 90% effort before the campaign and have 10% effort actually doing it."

It's absolutely true. When studying athletes and behavior, there is the concept known as "intentional practice," meaning that a person focuses on a single element in order to make him more effective when the time comes to use that element. In basketball, it could be the free throw, in soccer, the corner kick, and perhaps in opera the finale. 

In advertising, the work should be done to make sure the advertising is going to work. That is where neuroscience really comes in. The person quoted in this article, a director at Nielsen, states that using neuroscience not only makes advertising less costly, but makes the advertising targeted enough to be more effective.

That only makes sense.

The only times when neuroscience gets to be a nuisance is if you put someone in charge that has no idea what they are doing, or the C-Suite demands numbers and figures and the data presented isn't followed or is interpreted.

Neuroscience can be a fantastic additional tool for marketers and advertisers. It is time for more to use it.

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Dwayne W. Waite Jr. is partner and principal at JDW: The Charlotte Agency, a marketing and advertising shop in Charlotte, NC. He enjoys consumer behavior, economics, and football.
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