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Original articles from Stephen Kindel.
 
How to Read an Interviewer's 'Cues'
In this age of email, IMing, tweeting, and Google Hangouts, face-to-face communication is becoming increasingly rare. One of the unintended consequences of that fact is that young job entrants have developed a kind of situational Asperger’s Syndrome, that variant of autism spectrum disorder characterized by poor language selection and a lack of ability to “read” the faces of others or respond to their visual cues.

Freelancing: If You Don’t Ask, You Don’t Get
If you do a lot of freelance creative work, you might wonder what set you on the freelance path in the first place. In the old jobs-a-plenty economy, the answer might have been creative freedom, or indecision about how you wanted to spend your future and who you wanted to spend it with — the old failure-to-commit problem. Or perhaps you were just using the freelance life as a way of getting your foot in the door when you were just out of school or in the midst of a career change.

Freelancing: If You Don’t Ask, You Don’t Get
If you do a lot of freelance creative work, you might wonder what set you on the freelance path in the first place. In the old jobs-a-plenty economy, the answer might have been creative freedom, or indecision about how you wanted to spend your future and who you wanted to spend it with — the old failure-to-commit problem. Or perhaps you were just using the freelance life as a way of getting your foot in the door when you were just out of school or in the midst of a career change.

How to Read an Interviewer's 'Cues'
In this age of email, IMing, tweeting, and Google Hangouts, face-to-face communication is becoming increasingly rare. One of the unintended consequences of that fact is that young job entrants have developed a kind of situational Asperger’s Syndrome, that variant of autism spectrum disorder characterized by poor language selection and a lack of ability to “read” the faces of others or respond to their visual cues.

What Not to Say in an Interview
There are lots of things you should say in an interview. You should talk about your previous work experience and how it applies to the prospective job at hand. You should talk about how your background makes you eminently qualified for not only the job at hand and your “fit” with the company that may hire you. You should definitely talk up your skills and how they will allow you to solve whatever problems are thrown your way.

Dealing with Brain Freeze
As freelance writers, artists, and designers, you live more by the speed and agility of your brain than ordinary people. It is your ability to reach into the deepest recesses of your cerebrum to dig out an original solution or a creative breakthrough that sparks your life and puts money into your pocket.

Job Hunting Is An All-the-Time Affair
Don’t think of this advice as “the grass will always be greener someplace else” but rather as “the best defense is a strong offense.” You can do your best work and your company can still go belly-up in the blink of an eye, and just because you are looking for something new doesn’t mean that you have to act like you’ve got one foot out the door at the company at which you’re now gainfully employed.

It's Time to Assess Your Skills
The jobs are out there. I know people, particularly young people, who are well-skilled in the basics and have had no problem finding well-paying work. I know other young people, all of them talented in something, who cannot find anything more than part-time work or are scraping by on minimum-wage jobs. The difference between the two groups is basic skills.

Network! Network! Network!
In my first column back, I wrote about the necessity of developing a personal brand that represented who you are and that would help you differentiate yourself from people with similar backgrounds. One of the readers of the column took issue and said that even if you could develop a strong personal brand statement, if you were an older worker your chances of getting hired would be slim because your networks would have thinned out.

How to Be the Perfect Hire: Your Personal Brand DNA
It continues to be difficult to get hired, and partly that’s because of something that I heard called the “purple squirrel” phenomenon. What this refers to is the almost absurd detail to which potential employers go in describing the “perfect” hire. Such people don’t exist, and so the perfect becomes the enemy of the very good, and very good people wind up continuing to look for work.

Dressing the Part Can Get You the Job
You have to be prepared to jump immediately whenever the alarm sounds on an opportunity. Dress as if you are going to work every day, even if you go nowhere.

How to Become the Best Interviewee You Can Be
These techniques, if practiced diligently, will put you in better control of interviews and make you a better speaker when you are asked to stand up in front of a crowd to present information.

Who Goes on an Interview With You?
Sigmund Freud once wrote that every time you take someone to bed, you and your partner bring all of the past to bed with you -- domineering parents, past relationships, cultural attitudes, and more. The bed is so crowded and so scary that making love is best done in the dark under covers. Much the same can be said about job interviews.

Using Résumé Filters to Create Your Personal Brand DNA
Potential employers don’t just drop hints about what they want. They are as explicit as possible because they want to limit the deluge of résumés that will flow their way. By being specific, they can “score” an application on the basis of how many of their criteria you meet.

Syndicate!
Face it. There is a lot of bad creative out there, especially at the local advertising level. The way to change that, and to grab a lot of business for yourself is to think syndication.

Volunteering Creates Contacts
One of the problems with being out of work is that it suddenly gives you a lot of extra time to fill. Getting a job is a full time job in itself, but after you’ve visited all the job sites, and called around to the people you know, trying to stir the waters, you may find that you still have some extra time on your hands.

Know How vs. Know Who – What Do Employers Really Want?
In a shrinking economy, where companies struggle to maintain market share, let alone grow it, many jobs are what a friend of mine describes as “know who” jobs.

Build Your Credibility Bank
Linkedin.com and Spoke.com are ways to stay in touch, along with the ubiquitous Facebook and MySpace pages. But if you’re going to use them to your best benefit, you have to set up a credibility bank.

Metrics, Metrics, Metrics
Knowing the metrics of each job, and how well you met them, helps you put your best foot forward... it can also get you better jobs and higher pay.

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