TalentZoo.com |  Beyond Madison Avenue |  Digital Pivot |  Beneath the Brand Archives  |  Categories
TV Watching Now a Sign of Quaintness
September 19th, 2014 by Doug Bedell
If you watch a lot of TV, you may be simply be quaint. That's not the thing to be doing any longer. First it was newspapers, now it's TV (which itself helped kill newspapers) – the Internet and the digital revolution generally are directing society's attention span to...devices, electronic portholes of one type or another. This can be all to the good, because it gets us moving. To where is yet to be conclusively answered...

In Defense of Flacks
September 19th, 2014 by Mike Bush
A reporter writes a story about how PR people suck, and usually, the Twitter-verse blows up with flacks pointing at each other saying, “Told you not to do it that way,” (or more accurately…the normal statement is "I would never do it that way"). In fact, there is a tech blog that I’m fairly sure looks at page views...
#PR: NFL's PR Disaster
September 19th, 2014 by Gerard E. Mayers
By now I think it is pretty obvious that the entire National Football League (read the word owners) has come under severe scrutiny for how it has handled allegations in the past of domestic violence by team players and/or team staff.
Making Lively Community Use of 'Wasted' Spaces
September 18th, 2014 by Doug Bedell
Does your community have idle or underused spaces that could be put creatively to public use? Many communities do, and there is relational opportunity in such "wasted" spaces. Atlanta demonstrates what can be done with one such space – the Atlanta BeltLine, including the annual Lantern Parade. "The Atlanta Beltine," says its website, "is the most comprehensive transportation and economic development effort ever undertaken in the City of Atlanta and among the largest, most wide-ranging urban redevelopment programs currently underway in the United States." And it's brimming with community energy.
In the NFL: Money Talks, Sponsors Walk, and Then People Listen
September 18th, 2014 by Shawn Paul Wood
The circle of life for the Beautiful People rolls on much differently than it does for the rest of us. For the common folk, the wheel of life screeches to a complete halt, gets us in front of the tire, and runs us smooth over.
PR Guidance that Matters: Arthur Page's Seven Principles
September 17th, 2014 by Doug Bedell
Public relations is in a seemingly constant state of fending off something which, in the hands of its best practitioners, at least, it doesn't deserve – the image of being a crafty, manipulative synonym for "spin". We have Edward Bernays and Ivy Lee, PR's founders, largely to thank for that. But, following them, came others, like Arthur Page, who weren't treating PR so much as propaganda, but as responsible relational communication. Jeff Morosoff reminds us of Page on his blog, Public Relations Nation, where he lists Pages's "Seven Principles of Public Relations Management". We thank him for that – we need to keep Page's guidance before us. Like now...
NFL & Domestic Violence: The PR Silver Lining to Its Black Cloud
September 17th, 2014 by Shawn Paul Wood
The dream of running the most influential sports organization on the planet has become a nightmare for NFL Commissioner (for now) Roger Goodell. What should be noted is that it didn't begin with Ray Rice delivering a left cross to his then-fiancée, now-wife in a casino elevator.
'PR Measurement Week,' Not to be Shunned
September 16th, 2014 by Doug Bedell
We ought to note that this is Public Relations Measurement Week, as promoted by the International Association for the Measurement and Evaluation of Communication (AMEC). With the advent of digital PR, measuring discovery and results is virtually obligatory. Stephen Waddington provides some measuring counsel and leads here. "My personal call to practitioners," says Waddington, "is to investigate AMEC’s work and if you aren’t familiar with the Valid Metrics Framework please sign up to an education programme."
Next
Flack Me on
TuneFruit - licensed music for cheap
Advertise on Flack Me

Return to Top