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12 Smart Things to Say in Your Next Job Interview
By: Inc.
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So you've written an awesome cover letter and you've perfected your resume. However you did it, you've made it to the next phase of landing a job: The interview.


For some charismatic job interviewers, this is the easy part -- show up, wear something spiffy, and let the charm fly.


For the rest of us, though, the interview is often the most nerve-wracking. Luckily, Resume.io created a handy infographic with 12 useful phrases we should all be saying during each phase of the interview that will help land the job -- charisma or not.


Before the interview


1. "I was so excited when I learned this position was open."


According to Vicki Salemi, a Monster career expert, saying this right out the gate lets the interviewer know you are excited and enthusiastic about the position -- which should help you stand out from other candidates.


2. "I've worked in this field for..."


Giving a concise personal pitch before the interview even begins can help form stronger connections and make a positive first impression, according to leadership guru, Todd Dewett. Remember: keep this "elevator pitch" short, general (rather than specific), distinctive, and end with what you're looking for.


3. "I really like how your company [give an example of the company's achievement]."


This will show your potential new employer that you've put in the effort; not only have you taken time to research the company, but you're also a fan of what they're up to. (And if you haven't started researching yet -- what are you waiting for? Check out the company's website, social media, blogs, podcast, articles, etc.)


During the interview


1. "Here's how I can help your company."


"You need to clearly indicate potential value and relevance to the employer's needs," Georgia Adamson, CEO of A Successful Career, recently told The Independent. "If you don't, someone else probably will."


2. "I have experience with [requirement from job description]."


According to Monster's Vicki Salemi, using the particular keywords from the job description shows your interviewer that you speak the company language, which will make you a more attractive candidate. So before the interview, re-read the job description; think of these as interview buzzwords.


3. "So, what you're saying is..."


According to research published in the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, when you ask clarifying questions or repeat back / recap what somebody says it shows that you are actively listening. So show the interviewer that you're listening, engaged, and you care about understanding them.


Ending the interview

1. "What are your thoughts on me as a candidate?"


This will not only help you know where you stand, but it will also demonstrate to the employer that you are someone who wants to close the deal. "Most employers appreciate somebody who is going to close the deal, whether you're going for a sales role or something in another department altogether,"  Carolyn Betts Fleming, CEO of Betts Recruiting told The Independent. 


2. "This job sounds perfect for me because..."


Remember that opening elevator pitch you gave before the interview? Here's your chance to make a closing pitch. Keep it quick and leave them with your strengths in relation to the role, advises career coach, Thea Kelley. 


3. "I want this job."


This may seem forward but according to author Suzy Welch, concluding with this bold statement indicates three things hiring managers look for: sincerity, courage, and humility. 


After the Interview


1. "Thank you for taking the time to talk today."


Believe it or not, hiring managers only receive a thank-you note 24 percent of the time. So take the time to send an email -- or maybe even a handwritten note -- and stand out from the crowd. 


2. " Something I wanted to mention is..."


Chances are there were one or two questions during the interview that you kicked yourself about later. If that's the case, sending a follow-up email is the perfect chance to make amends and provide a clearer or expanded upon answer, says Alicia M. King from the Society for Human Resource Managers.


3. "Here's a link to my..."


If you didn't get a chance to share your personal portfolio, website, or other professional online resources during the interview, the follow-up email is a great time to send them over.


When it comes to interviews, you may feel confident and charismatic -- or more on the side of cautious and concerned. Either way, using these 12 phrases during each phase of the process is sure to help you land that job.




By Marcel SchwantesFounder and Chief Human Officer, Leadership From the Core


   

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