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The Go-To Ad Joke Is -- Still -- the White Male Moron
By: Digiday
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The objectification of women in advertising has been drastically reduced in the last 10 years, replaced by a wave of empowering “Femvertising.” And more and more brands are featuring gay and interracial couples in their ads. It’s a beautiful thing.

How about the white man as de facto dummy? Ha, yeah no. Sorry, no progress on your front, dudes.

In advertising, humor sells. Brands like to know that, at the very least, they’re making consumers laugh. Agencies like to make clients laugh because if they’re laughing, there’s a better chance that they’ll be buying.

But original ad humor takes talent and time. Well boo to that! Let’s go with the same tired linchpins we’ve been using for 50 years … one of which is the Stupid White Husband/Boyfriend/Man.

After seeing this new TurboTax commercial featuring a white male dullard and his pool a few times, I went deep ad archive diving, watching most of the national major brand spots released in the Western world over the last year. Hundreds of ads. I found over 50 White Man Moron ads.

And as I glanced at the credits on all these spots, I noticed an obvious if inexplicable thing: Most of the creatives who created these dumb white man ads — as in like 80 percent of them — were … white males.

Self-loathing, much? Maybe they’re making fun of certain male acquaintances who look and act like these dimwits? Or maybe it’s just hyper-laziness — they can write these characters in their sleep, because they are these characters?

I’m leaning toward that last explanation.

KEEP READING HERE


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About the Author
This article was published on Digiday.com.  A full link to the original piece is after the story. www.digiday.com
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