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How to Write: Advice from David Ogilvy
By: Dwayne W. Waite Jr.
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Not too long ago, we shared Kurt Vonnegut's tips for creative writing. Now, we would like to share more tips for writing well from David Ogilvy.

The following ten tips came from a company memo Ogilvy sent to his employees at Ogilvy & Mather on September 7, 1982.

"The better you write, the higher you go in Ogilvy & Mather. People who think well, write well. Woolly minded people write woolly memos, woolly letters and woolly speeches. Good writing is not a natural gift. You have to learn to write well. Here are 10 hints:

1. Read the Roman-Raphaelson book on writing. Read it three times.

2. Write the way you talk. Naturally.

3. Use short words, short sentences and short paragraphs.

4. Never use jargon words like reconceptualizedemassification, attitudinallyjudgmentally. They are hallmarks of a pretentious ass.

5. Never write more than two pages on any subject.

6. Check your quotations.

7. Never send a letter or a memo on the day you write it. Read it aloud the next morning—and then edit it.

8. If it is something important, get a colleague to improve it.

9. Before you send your letter or your memo, make sure it is crystal clear what you want the recipient to do.

10. If you want ACTION, don't write. Go and tell the guy what you want.

David"

This advice comes from the book The Unpublished David Ogilvy: A Selection of His Writings from the Files of His Partners. The book Ogilvy mentions in tip #1 is called Writing that Works.



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About the Author
Dwayne W. Waite Jr. is partner and principal at JDW: The Charlotte Agency, a marketing and advertising shop in Charlotte, NC. He enjoys consumer behavior, economics, and football.
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