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#PRFail: President Obama 'No Comprendo' Univision
By: Shawn Paul Wood
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The media tour. These are great tools, provided you can line one up. A hot spot tour bouncing from network to network, station to station, reporter to reporter. Most of the same questions, most of the same answers, but each with a different audience. These are gold for the average flack and par for the course if you are someone with a skosh of notoriety. Like, say, President Obama. 

Usually when there's some national weed in the American public's behind, there's a media tour to follow. Sometimes, an exclusive interview doesn't do the trick. And political folk don't usually hit the talk shows unless there are votes to be won or books to sell. If I was in the Presidential Office of Communications, and it was my gig to line up a media tour, I would know the ratings, media share, and reporters on each outlet. And then there's demographics — the quantifiable statistics of a given population. I would assume that would particularly important when selecting certain media outlets to make me buddies and help me swoon the voters. Only, according to this story from Politico, El Presidente is going to have to work extra hard making friends with Univision, because he just hacked off millions of Latinos. 

Last night, Obama sat down with six networks — ABC, CBS, CNN, FOX, NBC and PBS — in a concentrated effort to teach us all about Syria, how they suck, and why we need to bomb them into the Stone Age. Or something like that. However, Univision didn't get the memo...or an interview. 

Jose Zamora, a spokesperson for Univision, told us the network "did everything possible" to get an interview when the opportunity was announced, but were unsuccessful. "We think it’s a very important story for us and most importantly for our audience. The Hispanic community is a big part of the U.S. and it continues to grow and are interested in everything that happens in this country and about the impact decisions like these have for them and their families," Zamora said.

That was diplomatic. Jorge Ramos, Univision's main anchor, celebrated for his coverage and silver locks of love, was a little less delicate with the issue. Instead of a kindly phrased sound bite, he took to Twitter and expressed his angst for the world and his 952,000 potential voters. 

"Pres. Obama gives 6 interviews today. None of those to Univision. Why? Hispanics also care about Syria. Same mistake as presidential debates," Ramos tweeted on Monday. He added: "150,000+ Latinos are serving in the U.S. military. But none of the 6 interviews given today by Obama include Univision #LessonsNOTlearned."

So, what gives, guy who is about to be fired in the President's Office of Communications? You must like numbers, being in the White House and all, so here's one for you — 50,000,000. That's how many Hispanics live in America. Here's another — 71. That's the percentage of that 50 million that voted for your boss. Guess what? They may have buyer's remorse now. Certainly, an exclusive with Ramos is coming, with a fresh slate of questions and the President trying to cram Rosetta Stone in the limo on the way over. I get it. You aren't going to please everyone. Al Jazeera was hacked as well, so there's that, but you can't forget the sway, passion, and voice of the Latinos in this country. 

Yet, you did. So, work on your "Lo Siento, Senor Ramos" and get ready to discuss Syria a little and immigration reform more than that. Ah, politics. It's so bueno. 

   

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About the Author
Shawn Paul Wood is a hack-turned-flack with more than 20 years of collective journalism, copywriting and marketing communications experience. Shawn Paul is founder of Woodworks Communications in Dallas, Texas. If you need him, ping him here or follow him on Twitter @ShawnPaulWood
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